Edit/Op-Ed

As ‘Democracy’ Failing; Support For Monarchy Gaining Muscles

Our politicians have fought amongst themselves to destroy this country. The call ‘Bring the King save the country’ is increasingly getting louder.

Afroz Alam Sahil, BeyondHeadlines

 

Many in Nepal are talking of ‘old’ days under monarchs where things were at least not as bad.

Ram Babu Parshai, Convener of Nepali Congress (Nationalist) thinks that Nepal can only be saved by the King. He says “no one can govern Nepal. We all should try for constitutional monarchy.”

Anil Wasnet of Shiv Sena Nepal says that “we have seen all systems of governments but what was during the king is badly missing now. Politicians made false promises. Nepal was about to be made Switzerland of Asia but nothing happened. People have appealed to the king that he must rethink that people want him back. People want this to see as a Hindu Rashtra again.”

Altaf Ansari, President of Nepal Muslim Nagrik Samaj (NMNS) feels that Nepalese Muslims like the King. He goes on to say that “the Hindu Rashtra was better secure (for Muslims) than what is now. King had built two mosques near to his palaces. Today the situation is very bad and everywhere there is loot. Everyone wants the king to take over.”

Navaraj Gurung, a former member of Nepalese Youth Organization says that preparation have been started that the king will come to power one day. He seemed to suggest this is going to happen sooner than later. He gives an Indian example to drive home his point “the way Indian youth wants Rahul Gandhi, the youth prince is also wanted in Kathmandu.”

Bala Bhadra Bharti, a professor, says that “the Nepalese wanted the king to withdraw and the king responded. He left everything for the people. He didn’t leave the country. People wanted change but wanted economic development also and especially wanted not to migrate to India, China and Southeast Asia to get a job. This did not happen.”

Ashok Shresth, a leading film director says that “there is a guardian in the family who disciplines the children. The king is required to be back and take charge. The person who left home in the morning if comes back in the evening cannot be termed as someone who left home entirely.” He is concerned on the large scale conversion in the tribal areas. He says “the most concerned fact is that sale-buy of the religion in the post-king era. It is now American (Christian) organizations are proselytizing the innocent people in the hills.”

Mr. Shresth believes that his anguish over the political situation is not isolated rather it reflects the opinion of a large community in Nepal. To quote him directly, “along with the businessman, the common people also want the King to be back in power. Without the King Nepal will turn into a haven of terrorists. Anyway civil war like situation has gripped Nepal since last three years.

The people who sell potato and onion are better than our politicians. Our politicians have fought amongst themselves to destroy this country.” The call ‘Bring the King save the country’ is increasingly getting louder.

This is the second part of a series of articles on politics of monarchy and democracy in contemporary Nepal. The author visited Nepal and interacted with people from a large spectrum of life.

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